Tokyo Dome CD Reviews

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This topic has 28 voices, contains 115 replies, and was last updated by  JasonA 467 days ago.

April 10, 2015 at 5:26 pm Quote #44600

voodoo
(1876)

Just listening to the CD. I’ve heard this spot a few times while driving, but couldn’t figure out what he was saying. During Ice Cream Man, apparently the lighting guy was asleep at the wheel during Ed’s solo spot and Dave yells, “Spolight, asshole! Wake up!” Heh…I didn’t remember seeing that while watching the video.


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April 10, 2015 at 5:41 pm Quote #44601

ron
(8931)

voodoo: apparently the lighting guy was asleep at the wheel during Ed’s solo spot and Dave yells, “Spolight, asshole! Wake up!” Heh…I didn’t remember seeing that while watching the video.

Yeah, and then a few seconds later the spotlight is back on Ed.


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April 11, 2015 at 1:05 pm Quote #44624

VAiN
(2767)

voodoo: Just listening to the CD. I’ve heard this spot a few times while driving, but couldn’t figure out what he was saying. During Ice Cream Man, apparently the lighting guy was asleep at the wheel during Ed’s solo spot and Dave yells, “Spolight, asshole! Wake up!” Heh…I didn’t remember seeing that while watching the video.

He also says something like that at the end of Hot for Teacher, except he sings it.. it’s kind of subtle. The lighting guy was off his game that night.


Resident dickhead. I will hurt your delicate feelings.


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April 11, 2015 at 9:47 pm Quote #44632

Dave
(1940)

I think this guy pretty much sums it up nicely.

http://www.delcotimes.com/arts-and-entertainment/20150409/rock-music-menu-van-halen-releases-live-album-comes-under-fire

For a band that has been incredibly media weary for the past decade and a half, Van Halen spent some major time in the spotlight last week.

Monday and Tuesday saw them on “Jimmy Kimmel Live!” for a series of live performances. Wednesday, they appeared on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” to do a couple songs, and guitarist Eddie Van Halen gave a rare interview to The Washington Times.

All of it has been to promote a new record, “Tokyo Dome Live in Concert,” the first live album with original frontman David Lee Roth, and a 39-date summer tour, which hits the region Aug. 27 at the Susquehanna Bank Center in Camden, N.J.. That’s a call for rejoicing, right?

Not exactly.

Fans have been overly critical of a number of things, with the main contention directed at Roth and his refusal or inability sing the songs in the right key, properly or at all instead of talking his way through them. Incredulously, for a band that spent much of its career having enough drama to rival any daytime soap opera, some are calling on them to get a new singer — a fourth — or bring back original Roth replacement, Sammy Hagar, for a third time.

Speaking of Hagar, even he’s gotten into the act, speaking to the Las Vegas Review Journal this week and saying about the live album, “Every time they do something, I’m like, ‘Oh my god, can these guys do anything worse to their reputation and to the level of the music of the band?’ They’ve got some pretty rough vocals. Standing back, I’m just going, ‘What the (expletive) are these guys thinking?’”

Now, it’s no secret that Rock Music Menu is a fan of Van Halen, finding something positive in all incarnations. Even the Gary Cherone period had some great live shows. But I’m no apologist, and can call things out when they are just downright bad. Like those three new songs done with Hagar for the two-disc best of collection in 2004? Atrocious, especially lyrically. The Cherone album prior was fairly terrible, too.

But since Eddie and his brother, drummer Alex, reunited with Roth in 2007 and dismissed bassist Michael Anthony in favor of Eddie’s then-teenage son, Wolfgang, they’ve been under a microscope of negativity. First, it was because there was no new material to go with the reunion.

“A Different Kind of Truth,” the first VH album with Roth since 1984, came out in 2012, and despite it being musically on par with the classic six-pack of the Diamond Dave-era, there was massive discontent because much of the material was inspired by the band’s earlier demos. No matter that nearly every other rock outfit of note, including Aerosmith and AC/DC, has done the same thing in recent years, for some reason it was blasphemy that Van Halen did it.

Less than two years after the tour in support of the new album ended, fans were back to complaining — loudly — via message boards and social media about the lack of news, material and/or live dates coming from the VH camp.

When the two-disc “Tokyo Dome Live” release was announced, it became, “Why isn’t it a record of new material?” When Eddie told The Washington Times the group was initially going to release long-sought-after demos from the Pasadena, Calif., quartet’s early days, but decided not to because of the quality, there was uproar. When the Kimmel appearance was announced, it was, “Why not Fallon?” And the reaction to going on a daytime show geared toward middle-age women and hosted by a lesbian? It wasn’t pretty at all.

Granted, Roth didn’t help matters when, at the outset of the Kimmel performance, he split his nose open spinning a baton and had to halt the show — which had shutdown Hollywood Boulevard — so that he could get it quickly bandaged up. Things went much smoother on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show,” but at that point, the busted beak was all anyone could talk about.

As for the live album itself, yes, there are some tracks where Roth’s voice is less than spot-on and he does riff a lot instead of singing. But people seem to have a selective memory about the frontman’s live reputation — he’s never been a good singer. His shows were always about the performance, the verbal banter with the audience, the “Air Dave” toe-touching splits off the drum riser. At 60 years old, the latter is not happening anymore, so maybe this is the first time folks are noticing he’s never had a great voice in the first place.

The flipside is that the band, most notably Eddie, is playing phenomenally. The guitarist hasn’t been this spot-on since the 1995 to support the final album with Hagar, “Balance.” Check out his blazing solo “Eruption” from the Kimmel show and you’ll see how ridiculously on fire he is these days.

Hopefully, that carries over onto the tour, which kicks off July 5 and goes through October, and it gives the so-called “fans” a little less to complain about.

To contact music columnist Michael Christopher, send an email to rockmusicmenu@hotmail.com. Also check out his blog at http://www.delcotimes.com


Stay Frosty


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April 11, 2015 at 11:31 pm Quote #44636

wjamflan
(971)

But people seem to have a selective memory about the frontman’s live reputation — he’s never been a good singer. His shows were always about the performance, the verbal banter with the audience, the “Air Dave” toe-touching splits off the drum riser. At 60 years old, the latter is not happening anymore, so maybe this is the first time folks are noticing he’s never had a great voice in the first place.

The flipside is that the band, most notably Eddie, is playing phenomenally.

Hopefully, that carries over onto the tour, which kicks off July 5 and goes through October, and it gives the so-called “fans” a little less to complain about.

I am so sick of this ridiculous line of thinking. If I disagree with Eddie Trunk Jr. here I am somehow a “so-called fan”. Having a good voice and having a good range are two different things.

Billie Holiday had little to no range at all; but she had the best voice in all of jazz history IMHO. Just because she didn’t have Sarah Vaughn’s range didnn’t make her less of a good voice or singer. I believe her rhythmic style/phrasing, note choice, and vocal quality made her a far superior singer to Vaughn or any of the others. I understand it’s subjective because in the end, it comes down to what you like to listen to. For me, Roth is the same way. His phrasing, note choice, and the quality of his tone in the band’s heyday, far surpassed anything that Sammy or any of the other rock singers this side of Robert Plant have ever done.

DLR was a great voice for VH from ’78 – ’84, but he’s not anymore. He’s different. Whether you believe that it’s his choice or nature’s, he’s a different singer. That’s why he’s catching hell. I feel bad for him, especially if he’s doing what he’s doing by choice. But he was, once, a great rock and roll voice. Period.


“This hamburger don’t need no helper.” – DLR 5/17/15


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April 11, 2015 at 11:52 pm Quote #44637

mikeyV
(335)

I do believe that Roth’s singing has sunk….but I think he could make it work by doing things a little differently by working with the band, then going off, or driftling off, into his own little singing world and not following where he could be with the band.


The Ultimate in Van Halen Vinyl

Proud Member Since the First Year– Both VHTrading and the Band


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April 12, 2015 at 12:53 am Quote #44638

thismusicsux
(523)

jroundy:
I think during the ’07-’08 tour Dave’s voice sounded similar to his voice from ’91… which I thought was pretty amazing.Something obviously changed in his voice from the time of recording ADKOT, and the 2012 tour.
Watch any show from the ’07-’08 tour and you will see, or hear a big difference in Dave’s voice.

I agree 07-08 he was pretty damn good and no high pitch squealing. 2012-2015 not the same.

wjamflan:
The worst part of all of this is listening to people take the Eddie Trunk approach and say that Dave never could sing, especially live. That’s completely a bogus rewriting of history in my estimation. DLR from ’78 – ’84 sang the shit out the VH catalog live. Did he have his drunken moments or fried voice moments? Sure. All singers have those. The difference was that even when that was the case, Dave got a pass b/c he was so cool to watch and listen to. Now he’s just creepy to watch (uncool) and the vocal shortcomings are in your face and hard to take. They sound like someone trying too hard, not mailing it in. I can’t deny that anymore, but I refuse to agree that Dave wasn’t a great singer for VH back in the day. He did kick ass in his time.
The whole thing is just sad from this CVH fan’s perspective.

wjamflan: I am so sick of this ridiculous line of thinking. If I disagree with Eddie Trunk Jr. here I am somehow a “so-called fan”. Having a good voice and having a good range are two different things.
DLR was a great voice for VH from ’78 – ’84, but he’s not anymore. He’s different. Whether you believe that it’s his choice or nature’s, he’s a different singer. That’s why he’s catching hell. I feel bad for him, especially if he’s doing what he’s doing by choice. But he was, once, a great rock and roll voice. Period.

I’m 1000% with you on these chumps who keep saying “Oh.. Dave was never a good singer live…” — All the reviews, Eddie Trunk and fans saying this lie over and over. Look I understand the way he sang back in the day wasn’t what might stop people and say “damn that guy has a good voice” — but that’s mostly being uninformed. HE HAD PIPES AND COULD SING FINE. Especially 78-81 (82-84 it would seem he started to be even looser with the words and melodies, a slight slight difference but he was still bad ass).

There are many angles and issues (like all VH sagas). It’s true he was always pretty free with the melodies at times and chose which lyrics he wanted to sing (keep in mind he was blowing the minds of 15,000 fans for 2 hours jumping off drum risers n shit). So people today saying oh Dave was always like this, well to an extent yes (dropped lyrics here and there.) But he always sang fine, was totally in key and actually followed the melodies more than people say. I think a big issue is people are blowing these things way out of proportion. For most people, a crappy US Festival bootleg is the ONLY thing they are basing their info on. “Oh Dave forgot the words (mostly schtick from 82-84). Oh Dave was a mess and can’t sing.” That could describe the US Fest. But again it doesn’t represent 1978-1984 and beyond.

I’m pretty critical of the Tokyo CD. Most VH fans probably noticed the vocal change 3 years ago on tour. But there are spots where he sounds just fine for his age. Keeps it low and in correct delivery. But the high register squealing was never there before 2012 (well not to this extent). I do think it’s a choice. He’ll sound fine, but then gets excited, goes off script into the high zone for no reason. His voice has aged no doubt, but I think it’s a perception problem w Dave. He thinks it sounds good or he’s hitting these killer high notes. Not sure, but frustrating because now so many try to revise history and say “oh he never could sing, same ‘ol Dave”


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April 12, 2015 at 3:47 pm Quote #44658

jroundy
(1366)

Eddie Trunk does not listen to old Van Halen bootlegs from ’78-’84. If he did… he would not say “Dave was never a great singer”.

Maybe Dave didn’t sing all the words exactly as they were recorded on the albums, but his voice was just as good live as it was on the albums.


The poor folks play for keeps down here…They’re the living dead. Nobody rules these streets at night like Van Halen!!


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April 15, 2015 at 3:50 pm Quote #44775

Vince G.
(2157)

Finally got my hands on it yesterday at a Best Buy in Lincoln. Overall, I’m pleased with it. It’s a live album, with Roth, and for that I’m happy.

The mix sounds great. Dave, though….everyone is right, and everyone is wrong. Dave doesn’t need to be out there trying to sound like the Dave of ’78. He needs to realize the limitations of his vocal range and stay within that. He sounds fine on “Tattoo and “(Oh!) Pretty Woman”, since those songs don’t require any banshee screams or high-pitched squeals. I did notice that his vocals seem to be buried in the mix a bit. They’re not as out there as they are on the bootleg release of this show. Which is good, because there were some songs where I couldn’t even understand what the hell it was he was singing, because they sure as hell didn’t sound like the lyrics I knew.

As for everyone being wrong, well…name one singer from our era of music who still sounds EXACTLY THE SAME. Halford? No. Geoff Tate? No. Sebastian Bach? No. Plant? No. Hagar? Maybe, but he’s starting to hit rough patches as well, regardless what all the die-hard Redheads seem to think. At this point, and maybe its just me, I wouldn’t care if he was singing along to backing tracks to maybe give the impression he can actually carry a note live like he used to. I really do think Frank Hannon said it best: “For those of us who anxiously waited in line at Tower Records to get VHII, Women and Children First, and Fair Warning…this album will tickle your fancy…for those who want perfect vocals, buy a One Direction live album!!!””

Seriously.

I’m just glad that we finally have a live VH album with Roth at the helm, and one that doesn’t sound like it was completely redone in the studio.


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April 15, 2015 at 5:11 pm Quote #44782

Dave
(1940)

You know why I like this album?

Because it’s brown.


Stay Frosty


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April 15, 2015 at 5:29 pm Quote #44783

jroundy
(1366)

Dave: You know why I like this album?

Because it’s brown.

Brown like a turd? :wink:


The poor folks play for keeps down here…They’re the living dead. Nobody rules these streets at night like Van Halen!!


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April 16, 2015 at 11:03 am Quote #44800

ron
(8931)

http://swtimes.com/features/entertainment/review-live-album-delivers-without-prerecorded-track

Posted April 9, 2015 – 5:30am
Review: Live Album Delivers Without Prerecorded Track

For the Record
Van Halen
Title: “Tokyo Dome: Live In Concert”
Format: 2 CD set
Label: Rhino Entertainment/Warner Bros.
Genre: Rock (contains adult language)
Grade: B+
Other available formats: 4 Vinyl LP Set and 4-CD Set

By Scott Smith
Times Record – ssmith@swtimes.com

Politics, sports and religion aren’t the only topics that can split society right down the middle.

This week, it’s Van Halen’s new live album, the 25-track “Tokyo Dome: Live In Concert,” that is summoning divided votes and much-heated, occasionally obscene sparring on the Internet. And the infighting among the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame band’s supporters is stretching far past the dawn-of-time, David Lee Roth versus Sammy Hagar argument.

Some fans, astonishingly, are complaining that Van Halen — Roth (vocals), Eddie Van Halen (guitar), Alex Van Halen (drums) and Wolfgang Van Halen (bass) — didn’t riddle “Tokyo Dome” with post-studio doctoring. In 30 short years, the world has gone from a place that metaphorically crucified rock bands for using any kind of prerecorded background synthesizer track to demanding that any given performer sound exactly like his or her studio recording.

Some disgruntled fans of Van Halen are appalled at the in-concert sound of “Tokyo Dome,” but isn’t a live album supposed to offer something different, something special? To this writer’s ears, “Tokyo Dome” delivers. Yes, Roth occasionally rushes or lags behind the tempo, and he sometimes lets the supporting vocals of Eddie and Wolfgang carry him here and there, but Roth has always done that. Cue up Van Halen’s still-talked about spot at the 1983 US Festival on Youtube, and witness Roth in a much wobblier state than what is heard on “Tokyo Dome.”

As a singer, Roth’s limitations aren’t hidden on “Tokyo Dome” (Van Halen purportedly didn’t overdub any of the new album’s songs). Roth isn’t Freddie Mercury or Paul Rodgers, but the eternally smiling Roth never pretended to be anything other than a charismatic, party-seeking front-man.

Recorded on June 21, 2013, in front of 40,000 fans, “Tokyo Dome” lets Roth’s personality — think a rock-and-roll version of Willy Wonka — go on full-tilt display, but it’s the instrumentalists who really cook. Eddie Van Halen’s furious riffing and still-jaw-dropping guitar soloing still sound phenomenal on the new album, his fretboard-loving fingers seemingly unweathered by Father Time.

Essentially, Van Halen sounds as strong on “Tokyo Dome” as they did in Tulsa back in May 2012 — super loud, inspired and with a couple of flaws. The chugging six-string work that signals the beginning of set-opener “Unchained” is invigorating, as is the sweaty run-through of “Runnin’ with the Devil.”

Yes, Van Halen co-founding bass player Michael Anthony’s background vocals are missed — Anthony and former singer Sammy Hagar both were dismissed following Van Halen’s 2004 tour — but Wolfgang’s capabilities across four strings reveal “Wolfie” inherited some of his old man’s music-making magic. Throughout the gig, Wolfgang’s bass alternates between in-the-pocket grooving to embodying short blasts of lead bass in the vein of bass masters Geddy Lee and Chris Squire.

Most of Van Halen’s goodies are found on “Tokyo Dome.” “Hot For Teacher,” “Panama,” “Hear About it Later,” “Ain’t Talkin’ ‘Bout Love,” “Mean Street,” “Everybody Wants Some!!” and the Eddie mini-masterpiece “Eruption,” as well as the more recent “She’s the Woman,” “Tattoo” and “China Town,” proudly are accounted for on the recording. Even Van Halen’s covers of Roy Orbison’s “(Oh!) Pretty Woman” and The Kinks’ “You Really Got Me” retain their grit and likable nature without disrespecting the original writers.

Thankfully, Van Halen did go all revisionistic-crazy and overdub “Tokyo Dome.” Those few weaker moments give the album charm and begs a question: Why in the world would anyone fork over a small fortune to pay for tickets and expect to hear a band sound exactly like a CD? That would defeat the entire purpose of sitting or standing in a darkened venue and experiencing the unpredictable magic that’s found within “live” music.


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April 19, 2015 at 4:22 pm Quote #44883

ron
(8931)

http://www.odt.co.nz/entertainment/music/339341/cd-review-van-halen

CD review: Van Halen
Mon, 20 Apr 2015

The biggest question here is, why did they not do this 30 years ago?

As the first live album featuring the original line-up sans the so-so Hagar years, it’s a great trip down memory lane.

Although that memory is tarnished somewhat by David Lee Roth’s struggles with the requisite vocal gymnastics.

Fortunately, Eddie’s ”brown” sound is intact. Suffering through the loss of Michael Anthony’s high squeals and harmonies, DLR does at least inject the type of ad-libbing that makes him the consummate showman, something Hagar never was.

Tokyo Dome is full of classics from a golden era and just hearing Ed play those classic riffs is worth the price of admission.

- Van Halen. Tokyo Dome Live in Concert. Warner Bros.

- Three stars (out of five)

Single download: Hot for Teacher
For those who like: Van Halen, The Darkness, Steel Panther

- Mark Orton


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April 19, 2015 at 9:54 pm Quote #44885

rknhrse112
(20)

if ure wanting …78 -82 sound its not there and not going to be ….looking back on the memories…is the best we can do………


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April 20, 2015 at 6:20 pm Quote #44896

VAiN
(2767)

rknhrse112: if ure wanting …78 -82 sound its not there and not going to be ….looking back on the memories…is the best we can do………

We’ll see what Ed’s new ‘secret’ amp based on the old Marshall sounds like.. It’s definitely a move in the right direction. Ed’s tone hasn’t been great in a while.


Resident dickhead. I will hurt your delicate feelings.


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