Van Halen – 2004-09-17- Phillips Arena – Atlanta, GA – ALD

TopicsAll ForumsThe Great Bootleg ForestUnofficial Live Audio RecordingsVan Halen – 2004-09-17- Phillips Arena – Atlanta, GA – ALD

This topic has 18 voices, contains 53 replies, and was last updated by  eruption1962 1203 days ago.

June 5, 2014 at 12:01 am Quote #36355

MrGrayson
(27)

No, this isn’t an ALD or a Soundboard. It is actually Eddie’s IEM feed.


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June 5, 2014 at 8:59 am Quote #36356

ron
(8967)

Big Jon: In addition to the artwork the uploader included with the torrent, I’ve added what I believe to be the proper artwork for this version.

The artwork in the torrent is the correct artwork for the show, just incomplete. The original artwork also included an inlay card and an “back” to the cover art.

There was a different set of artwork created subsequently, which had a white background, and the State of GA on the front and blue text.

Which artwork were you able to find?


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June 5, 2014 at 9:34 am Quote #36361

ron
(8967)

MrGrayson: No, this isn’t an ALD or a Soundboard. It is actually Eddie’s IEM feed.

This may be the question of a fool (me), but why would Ed have his guitar in his own feed?


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June 5, 2014 at 12:25 pm Quote #36363

Big Jon
(207)

ron: The artwork in the torrent is the correct artwork for the show, just incomplete.The original artwork also included an inlay card and an “back” to the cover art.

There was a different set of artwork created subsequently, which had a white background, and the State of GA on the front and blue text.

Which artwork were you able to find?

I added the front and back for the artwork you referenced, the white background with the State of Georgia on the front and blue text.


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June 5, 2014 at 1:38 pm Quote #36364

jroundy
(1366)

ron: This may be the question of a fool (me), but why would Ed have his guitar in his own feed?

So he can hear how poorly he was playing. :wink:


The poor folks play for keeps down here…They’re the living dead. Nobody rules these streets at night like Van Halen!!


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June 5, 2014 at 2:00 pm Quote #36365

guitard
(7354)

MrGrayson: No, this isn’t an ALD or a Soundboard. It is actually Eddie’s IEM feed.


All I can say is that I was sent a recording that’s described as an ALD synched with a nice audience recording by a guy who has been mixing ALDs, SBDs, and IEMs for many years. I haven’t actually listened to it though, so I can’t yet say anything based on what my own ears tell me about it. I think the dead giveaway will be if there is a click track (which indicates it’s an IEM).


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June 5, 2014 at 2:38 pm Quote #36370

ron
(8967)

Bootleggers use device for deaf to record live shows illegally

Monday, July 31, 2000

By LARRY McSHANE
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — A system designed to help the hearing-impaired at concerts has provided bootleggers with a new tool to make illegal live recordings of exceptional quality, according to the record industry.

This latest wrinkle in the multimillion-dollar bootlegging industry takes advantage of a federal law requiring arenas to offer patrons use of an assistive listening device.

“We know through criminal investigations and informants that this is a common practice,” said Frank Creighton, senior vice president of anti-piracy at the Recording Industry Association of America.

Bootleggers can request an ALD headset, which provides a high-quality feed of a live show using a low-level FM frequency broadcast inside a facility.

The music pirates then steal the headset feed, giving them concert performances devoid of the usual bootleg problems such as random crowd noise or distortion, Creighton said.

“The quality is much higher than a typical bootleg,” Creighton continued. “No question about it.”

Bootleggers are using the devices provided for the hearing-impaired to record near-pristine versions of concerts by veterans like Bruce Springsteen and Bob Dylan plus a plethora of new acts.

“Every major act that’s in the Billboard top 100 is getting bootlegged in some manner,” Creighton says.

Advocates for the hearing-impaired were appalled by the new pirating technique.

“Oh my goodness! What concerns me is if this becomes so prevalent that the service is dropped,” said Mercy Coogan of Gallaudet University, the Washington, D.C.-based college for deaf and hard of hearing students.

“That could prohibit a whole lot of hard-of-hearing people from this very important mode of access.”

Arenas are required to provide the ALDs under the federal Americans with Disability Act, which marked its 10th anniversary Wednesday.

Typical of the ALD bootlegs is a Springsteen concert last Aug. 22 at Boston’s Fleet Center — one of the most popular illegal recordings of the Boss’ E Street Band reunion tour, according to Internet sites.

The three-CD collection is advertised as “soundboard quality,” with various mentions that it was done through an ALD.

The ALD rip-offs were news to officials at several major concert venues from coast to coast, including the new Staples Center in Los Angeles and the First Union Center in Philadelphia.

“We have the devices, but I haven’t heard of this,” said Ike Williams of the First United Center in Philadelphia.

Creighton says that arena policing is generally left up to bands and their road crews; many groups, from the Allman Brothers to the Dave Matthews Band, have encouraged their fans to tape and trade live performances.

The Recording Industry Association of America only becomes involved once the illegal material is manufactured and distributed, according to Creighton.

The association says hundreds of millions of dollars are lost annually through the various forms of bootlegging, and this new technique should add to that total.


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June 5, 2014 at 3:25 pm Quote #36371

ron
(8967)

Big Jon: In addition to the artwork the uploader included with the torrent, I’ve added what I believe to be the proper artwork for this version.

I’ve had a closer look at the two different artworks for this release.

Looks like the show was originally shared via TTD, and then re-upped at DIME a day later by Oryo.

The white artwork was posted to TDD. Dunno where I got the “Hurricane Halen” artwork from, but I suspect it was DIME.

The time stamps reveal that the Hurricane Halen artwork was possibly included with the torrent I downloaded, as it’s less than 10 minutes before the first part of the other torrented files were created on my system. If it wasn’t part of the torrent I downloaded, it was where I got the torrent from.

I grabbed the white artwork almost 5 months later, but I see that it was posted to the TDD thread the day after the torrent was uploaded. Based on the timestamps, I can see that I had grabbed the Hurricane Halen artwork about 3 hours before the white artwork was posted to TDD.

So which artwork is the first one? I lean towards the Hurricane Halen version based on my timestamps. But I’m open to all other information.


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June 5, 2014 at 6:01 pm Quote #36378

ModelCitizen
(255)

guitard: There are a lot of things that can go wrong.But if everything goes exactly as planned, then yes, you can record a near soundboard recording.

The people who have the most success with these usually use their own equipment (receiver) and figure out where the sweet spot is in a venue for recording the ALD feed (which is basically a weak AM radio signal).

There was a guy in Florida who recorded several really nice ALD recordings from Ruth Eckard Hall in Clearwater while sitting in his car in the venue parking lot.So he didn’t even have to buy a ticket.That’s kind of an extreme case though, because at most places, the signal never makes it that far.

Pretty cool. Surprised this doesn’t happen more often. Any idea if the shows mentioned will ever surface? I assume they are VH?


…Zero Discipline


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June 6, 2014 at 12:53 am Quote #36389

guitard
(7354)

Those recordings from Ruth Eckard Hall were all shared at Dime – that’s how I know about them.


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June 6, 2014 at 1:46 am Quote #36391

MrGrayson
(27)

I believe that Alex’s IEM feed has a click track, I don’t think Eddie uses a click track. I believe that the main purpose for an IEM is to hear yourself playing. Ed’s guitar & vocals are really high up in the mix. The bass on this recording is virtually non-existent except for Mike’s bass solo, an ALD should have a little bit more bass. Keep in mind that Eddie doesn’t like Mike, so I can see Ed having Mike’s bass turned down in his IEM. The drums are a little quieter than they would be in a ALD, Sammy’s vocals are hotter then they would be in a ALD. Keep in mind that this recording is from 2004 and advances in technology have made made since then. Also this recording sounds mono to my ears, both ALD and single IEM feeds are usually mono. But maybe they mix ALDs differently in Atlanta? Personally, I call BS on an audience recording being synched up to this.


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June 6, 2014 at 3:27 am Quote #36392

guitard
(7354)

I believe that Alex’s IEM feed has a click track, I don’t think Eddie uses a click track.

I thought I heard that everyone in VH receives a click track in their IEM. I’m working on a DVD/blu-ray of the Greensboro 4-21-12 show that will have a matrix of two IEMs and an audience recording, and I know it has a click track (that the guy who mastered it worked hard to mitigate). It’s mixed in Dolby 5.1 with the IEM feeds in different channels, so it should be easy to hear if both IEM recordings have click tracks.

Also this recording sounds mono to my ears, both ALD and single IEM feeds are usually mono. But maybe they mix ALDs differently in Atlanta?

Actually, most modern IEM signals are stereo. However, in order to record a stereo IEM signal, obviously, you have to have a stereo receiver. There are basically two ways to record an IEM: 1) The taper also uses an IEM receiver – optimally the same model that the performer is using – and records the audio coming out of the receiver’s audio out jack with a recording device – in stereo. 2) Or the taper uses a broadband receiver (Icom is a popular brand for this stuff) – and records that signal into a recorder – in stereo or mono – depending on the reception capability of the receiver (older models typically are mono-only). For example, in the case of an Icom IC-05 – the recording will be mono because that’s a mono-only receiver. A lot of IEM tapers like to use a broadband receiver because of the cost savings and versatility it offers. IEM receivers are expensive and are set to receive a set frequency range. For example, the Sennheiser EK 300 IEM G2-A has a frequency range of 518-554 MHz, while the EK 300 IEM G2-B model has a range of 626-662 MHz. Those are the two most commonly used IEM frequency ranges in the US, and I believe those are the ranges authorized for use in the US by the FCC. But some bands, especially European bands, might show up using G2C, G2D, or G2E models – all of which use different frequency ranges. Most experienced IEM tapers know ahead of time what frequency range receivers a band uses. If you only have a broadband receiver – you can capture pretty much any frequency out there. But it’s unlikely that you’ll get the same quality signal that you’ll get using the same IEM brand/model as the performer.

Personally, I call BS on an audience recording being synched up to this.


Who said the recording you have is synched with an audience recording? If you’re referring to my previous comment, you’re making the assumption that the recording to which I made reference is the same as the one you have. That would be a mistake, because the one to which I’m referring is newly created and has never been circulated.


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June 6, 2014 at 7:01 am Quote #36406

PT5150
(5527)

Randy this sounds AWESOME….. :wink:

I’m working on a DVD/blu-ray of the Greensboro 4-21-12 show that will have a matrix of two IEMs and an audience recording.


EDDIE’S fingers aren’t fingers they are muscle-powered pistons that hammer guitar strings to the fretboard with the force of a rivet gun”.


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June 6, 2014 at 9:41 am Quote #36410

jroundy
(1366)

It makes sense that Ed, Wolf and Al would have click tracks. Dave maybe not.

Ed didn’t use IEM’s on the last two tours that I could see. Don’t know if I have ever seen him use them.


The poor folks play for keeps down here…They’re the living dead. Nobody rules these streets at night like Van Halen!!


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June 6, 2014 at 1:18 pm Quote #36413

frankm
(4758)

ron: Bootleggers use device for deaf to record live shows illegallyMonday, July 31, 2000By LARRY McSHANETHE ASSOCIATED PRESSThe Recording Industry Association of America only becomes involved once the illegal material is manufactured and distributed, according to Creighton.The association says hundreds of millions of dollars are lost annually through the various forms of bootlegging, and this new technique should add to that total.

I would like to see the supporting data for the last statement.

Bands could curb this whole thing by taking the Pearl Jam route or the Metallica route or the Blues Traveler route or any number of other ways to deal with recordings


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